The Best Small Business Banks in Philadelphia

MultiFunding is proud to announce the 2014, top 20 banks in Philadelphia for lending to small businesses. In early November 2014 MultiFunding partnered with Entrepreneur Media to launch an innovative and state of the art interactive search tool, like Zillow, that makes it possible for entrepreneurs to instantly identify and evaluate local banks by their track records for lending to small businesses.

The Bank Search tool calculates the total dollar value of loans made by a bank to small businesses. Small business loans are defined as loans between $100,000 and $1,000,000, then divided by the total number of branches owned by the bank. In addition to a list of local results based on this equation, entrepreneurs can see an estimate of small‐business loan balances held at each branch.

“One of the biggest challenges that small businesses face is access to capital,” says Ami Kassar, CEO of MultiFunding. “Our grading system and website help small business owners find local banks that are friends of small business.”

 

The best small business banks around Philadelphia are:

The Bancorp Bank
Ally Bank
Milestone Bank
Meridian Bank
First Resource Bank
The Victory Bank
Chase Bank Usa, National Association
Parke Bank
Monument Bank
Capital Bank of New Jersey
First Trust Savings
Noah Bank
First Bank
Liberty Bell Bank
Quaint Oak Bank
First Choice Bank
1st Colonial Community Bank
Republic Bank
Customers Bank
Woori American Bank

The Best Small Business Banks in New York

MultiFunding is proud to announce the 2014, top 20 banks in New York for lending to small businesses. In early November 2014 MultiFunding partnered with Entrepreneur Media to launch an innovative and state of the art interactive search tool, like Zillow, that makes it possible for entrepreneurs to instantly identify and evaluate local banks by their track records for lending to small businesses.

The Bank Search tool calculates the total dollar value of loans made by a bank to small businesses. Small business loans are defined as loans between $100,000 and $1,000,000, then divided by the total number of branches owned by the bank. In addition to a list of local results based on this equation, entrepreneurs can see an estimate of small‐business loan balances held at each branch.

“One of the biggest challenges that small businesses face is access to capital,” says Ami Kassar, CEO of MultiFunding. “Our grading system and website help small business owners find local banks that are friends of small business.”

 

The best small business banks around New York are:

Cross River Bank
Signature Bank
Freedom Bank
Radius Bank
Hanover Community Bank
Maspeth Federal Savings and Loan
Savoy Bank
Emigrant Bank
Newbank
Asia Bank
Colonial American Bank
Bnb Hana Bank, National Association
The West Chester Bank
Bbcn Bank
Empire State Bank
Manasquan Savings Bank
Noah Bank
Amerasia Bank
Sterling National Bank
Wilshire Bank

The Best Small Business Banks in Chicago

MultiFunding is proud to announce the 2014, top 20 banks in Chicago for lending to small businesses. In early November 2014 MultiFunding partnered with Entrepreneur Media to launch an innovative and state of the art interactive search tool, like Zillow, that makes it possible for entrepreneurs to instantly identify and evaluate local banks by their track records for lending to small businesses.

The Bank Search tool calculates the total dollar value of loans made by a bank to small businesses. Small business loans are defined as loans between $100,000 and $1,000,000, then divided by the total number of branches owned by the bank. In addition to a list of local results based on this equation, entrepreneurs can see an estimate of small‐business loan balances held at each branch.

“One of the biggest challenges that small businesses face is access to capital,” says Ami Kassar, CEO of MultiFunding. “Our grading system and website help small business owners find local banks that are friends of small business.”

 

The best small business banks around Chicago are:

First Bank Of Highland Park
Delaware Place Bank
Itasca Bank & Trust Co.
Ridgestone Bank
Union National Bank And Trust Company Of Elgin
Lake Forest Bank and Trust
American Heartland Bank And Trust
American Chartered Bank
Lakeside Bank
Golden Eagle Community Bank
St. Charles Bank and Trust
Gold Coast Bank
Village Bank and Trust
Cornerstone National Bank & Trust Company
Cornerstone National Bank & Trust Company
Lincolnway Community Bank
Forest Park National Bank And Trust Company
Barrington Bank and Trust
Northbrook Bank
LibertyVille Bank and Trust

 

 

How to Cure Entrepreneurial Brain Freeze

Some entrepreneurs spend months trying to raise more money than they actually need to achieve proof of concept.  Many get stuck on the grand vision of their company’s future instead of deploying the resources and assets at their disposal.  I call this entrepreneurial brain freeze.  When I started my first venture, it took me six months to get a meeting with angel investors.  I was so excited that I spent 72 hours straight marathon writing a business plan and financial forecast in order to convince the investors why I needed $2 million to start my company.

I showed up in a fancy suit and tie, and the first thing that the investors did was rip up my forecast and asked me what I could do with just $200,000.  I was initially shocked that they would lowball me like that, but in the end, realized they were right.  This experience taught me, in retrospect, that if I had just tried to raise $200,000 instead of $2 million months earlier, I would have reached the starting line much faster.  I had to cure my own case of entrepreneurial brain freeze.

At my loan-advisory office, we speak with business owners who show the common symptoms of brain freeze: they’re stuck within the confines of their company vision and unwilling to stray from their buttoned up business plans.  Before discussing funding options, we first ask them what they need the money for and why.  The reality is that usually there is a way to meet their objectives with much less money.

The business owner might be foregoing short-term profits by seeking less startup capital, but they are moving commerce sooner, and that is what’s important.  The best proof of a viable business is active commerce, not funding.

A few weeks ago, I met an entrepreneur who wanted to start a golf simulator business.  He wanted to raise money for his own facility, with two owned or leased machines, and also wanted more capital to market his business.  At the time of the call, though, he didn’t even have a proof of concept, no customers on the horizon and yet wanted to borrow or raise a couple of hundred thousand dollars in equity.  I had to take a step back with this entrepreneur instead of pushing him toward a loan that he would later regret.  A better option was to partner with local golf stores by installing his simulators in their shops.  By piggybacking off of the store’s existing customer base, the entrepreneur was drastically cutting his marketing dollars while also achieving a proof of concept in exchange for profit sharing with the existing golf store.

Instead of seeking $500,000 to launch his business, the entrepreneur only needed $50,000 to get started.  This is a much more reasonable goal.

If you’re trying to borrow money before you’ve gotten one customer, you’re likely going to give away more equity than you have to, or it’s going to cost you way too much to borrow money.  There can be huge benefit in shrinking a grandiose vision, shaking off the entrepreneurial brain freeze and proceeding with calculated baby steps rather than rushing a new business the the finish line.

Choosing A Lender? Watch out for These Costly Traps

Small-business owners seeking financing have hundreds of options thanks to a proliferation of lending firms and programs offering fast and easy solutions.  But the reality is only a few of these choices will be the right fit for your nascent business.  Although the lure of quick cash regardless of personal credit can be tempting, be wary of common traps when considering a lender for your company:

1. Know when business credit services are necessary — and when they absolutely are not.  While business credit can be important as your business matures, it doesn’t make a difference for a startup applying for a loan.  Startups are not expected to have a strong business credit file, so any firm extolling the necessity of business credit services to apply for a loan may actually be doing you a disservice.

Instead, concentrate on the strength of your personal credit, as lenders will focus on this more because you will ultimately be responsible for paying back the loan.

2. Know the price you pay for speed and convenience.  Some short-term lenders and cash advance companies offer so-called “fast” loans with quick application processes and a lax review of personal credit.  This speed and convenience comes at a cost, however.  Entrepreneurs should be careful when considering a cash advance, especially if rates and pay off timeframes are extremely harsh.  Some firms offer annualized percentage rates as high as 200 percent with amortizations as slow as three to four months — terms like these can be a nail in the coffin before a business is even birthed.

Protect your business by reading all terms carefully and make sure you have a clear plan to pay back the loan before signing on the dotted line for a cash advance.

3. Don’t outsource; know your own business plan.  Be wary of any company insisting that you need a business plan and financial forecast in order to sell you an expensive business plan package.  Additionally, if you’re paying someone else to do this work for you, then your business may have bigger problems.  Having a direct hand in developing the business plan and financial projections ensures that you as the business owner know the ins and outs of the company and have defined goals for growth.

Have a good understanding of what makes your business tick in the present, and where it is realistically headed in the future to protect it from other unnecessary expenditures that you may encounter throughout the startup journey.

Applying for a Loan? You Need to Know This One Thing

Understanding debt obligations is the most important thing when applying for a loan.

There are many things a borrower needs to consider when thinking about a loan, but one outweighs all others by a landslide: what the monthly payment on the loan will be and whether that borrower can or cannot afford the payments.

I don’t want to minimize the other things that borrowers need to consider–liens, prepayment penalties, etc.–but this one fundamental tops the list.  Borrowers must understand what their monthly debt obligation will be and validate this versus current income and potential income from the proceeds of the loan under consideration.

When weighing the idea of any loan, the borrower should be confident that he or she can comfortably afford it.  If the monthly payments take too much of a bite out of your cash flow, you’re probably going to find yourself having to add more and more debt to keep afloat.

Taking out a loan that you are not confident you can pay back is too often the final nail in the coffin for suffering businesses–or the force that pushes a business over the edge into a perpetual debt cycle.

Sit down and carefully consider your current financials and projected financials over the next fiscal year.  If a loan doesn’t comfortably fit into the equation, it may not be the best time to seek financing or may be an indicator that there are bigger problems in the business that need to be dealt with before a loan is considered.

Five Questions to Ask an Alternative Lender

Finding the right alternative lender can make a huge difference for small business.

A good alternative lender is one who is cognizant of their role within the small business industry–a means to an end.  Alternative lenders should act as a bridge for small businesses to get them out of a financial hole and back into a positive cash flow.  A good alternative lender lends the borrower just what they need to achieve this goal, not the max amount that the borrower qualifies for in order to increase payments and interest.

Because we don’t know a lot about alternative lending industry activities–how much they lend each quarter, the terms of all loans, or even who all of the lenders are–what distinguishes a “good” alternative lender from a “bad” alternative lender is a bit of a gray line.

However, there are some definitive things to think about when seeking capital from an alternative lender to decide if they have you and your businesses best interest in mind, or if they are solely focused on collecting payments.  Here are some questions to ask when pursuing an alternative lender for financing:

1.  What percentage of the time do the borrowers need to come back to the lender for more money?  Knowing the renewal rate of the lender will help you determine if it’s likely your business will get trapped in a debt cycle.

2.  What are the prepayment penalties?  Can a customer get out of the loan at anytime with little to no prepayment penalty?  Or are they locked in to paying the balance of the loan for the length of the loan?

3.  What percentage of clients graduate to bank financing?  If this stat is relatively high, it’s a good indicator that the alternative lender is interested in helping business move into loan products that are more affordable with longer amortization periods.

4.  What is the lien structure for the alternative lender?  Do they take blanket liens on all assets of the company, which can make it difficult to borrow money in the future from other lenders?  Or do they take liens on specific assets that they are borrowing against?

5.  Does the lender offer counseling or advice?  Lenders that loan money without any counseling generally don’t have the borrower’s best interest in mind.  A good lender will offer the borrower counseling regarding cash flow impact and making sure that there is a clear plan for the borrower to be able to afford the loan and make the business better with the loan.

A Loan Broker’s Responsibility to Small Business

Helping small businesses get into bank loan financing should be the driving force for brokers.

At my loan brokerage office, our mission is clear–we want every company we work with to get to a point where they are bankable through an SBA-backed loan or another traditional bank loan.  If a company is considered “bankable “, that is, they meet all of the criteria necessary to receive financing through an FDIC-insured bank, they’ve earned the right to get the cheapest loans that will allow them the best opportunities to grow and create jobs.

This being said, we’re not naive to think that every company is bankable: in fact, most are not.

In cases when we work with these non-bankable companies, our driving force is always to help them get to the point where their chances of being approved for a traditional loan are greatest.  While small businesses work towards this goal, it’s likely that they will pay more for capital through alternative loans.  However, we don’t want them to get stuck in the land mines of alternative lending or be forced into endless renewals.  We guide them and help them maneuver the lending landscape, identifying the lenders who will work with them and celebrate when they graduate to a bank loan.

We attack this challenge on a micro and macro level.  On a micro level, we treat each company and entrepreneur we work with care and concern for the longevity of their business, and do our very best to help them find financing that works for their unique company.  We also speak out for the need of reform and transparency within the alternative lending space.  These high-cost loans as a last resort recommendation for small business owners.

On a macro level, we have created tools like Banking Grades which has evolved to Entrepreneur Bank Search to help companies we don’t have the opportunity to help.

I also personally take my position as an advocate for small businesses within the lending industry as a serious endeavor.  My published work, in addition to speaking engagements at conventions and lobbying our government, is all aimed at helping create a path to bankability for entrepreneurs.

It’s time to step up as loan brokers and accept the responsibility that we have to act on behalf of entrepreneurs in order to help them receive smart money for their businesses.  Brokers who act with their best interests in mind at the expense of small business owners are doing a great disservice to the small business industry and the economy as a whole.

As a loan broker, it’s vitally important that we always treat borrowed money for a client as a means to an end.  The “end” for some businesses will be to pay off a loan.  In many cases, however, the “end” is becoming bankable and entering into an affordable, FDIC-insured bank loan.

 

MultiFunding Turns 5

Dear Friends,
On January 1, in addition to celebrating the New Year, MultiFunding will turn five.
On one hand, I want to slow down, take a breathe and celebrate. After all, it is an accomplishment. I want to jump up and down with the team and discuss the victories along the way towards this milestone.
And on the other hand, the five-year mark is just another day on the long journey of building a business. I’m sure it won’t really feel any different.
As so many of us know, being an entrepreneur is tough and can be extremely lonely. I can’t really compare the last five years to anything I’ve ever been through or done before. Those who haven’t traveled this journey simply wouldn’t understand it.
Entrepreneurs are a club of sorts. When we get together, we understand each other. Some people dream about being an entrepreneur one day-but fantasizing and doing are very different things.
In my mind, entrepreneurs are heroes and our entire economy is driven by the success of those who choose to join this club. As I’ve fully realized how tough it is to build a company over the past few years, I’ve become more resolute and determined than ever to help entrepreneurs connect with the resources they need to help feel safe and protected on their journey to success.
Can you think of a brand or a company that truly stands for helping entrepreneurs and small-business owners? Some like to make that promise-but if you dig under the covers you will find lots of concerns.
My focus for MultiFunding, as we continue to grow, is to really, truly help other entrepreneurs. We will treat other entrepreneurs as we would hope to be treated, and consider every client we work with to be the hero that they are.
For those of you who have joined us and helped us in our adventure over the past five years, I am forever grateful. And to those who want to be a part of the mission going forward, we welcome you with open arms.
From our family to yours, we wish you a Happy Holiday season and a prosperous and healthy 2015.
Best,
Ami & The Team

The Missing Ingredient in “Shark Tank”

Adding a lender to the panel of sharks would give the show more depth and educational value.

In the past week’s episode of Shark Tank, Curt Campbell, an entrepreneur from the tiny town of Fish Creek, Wisconsin pitched his company www.oilerie.com to the sharks for an investment.

In his pitch, Mr. Campbell talked about putting it all on the line for his company, and told stories of having his power and cable shut off at earlier stages in the business.

While Mark Cuban did make an investment, I thought his response to Mr. Campbell was genuine.  He thanked him for telling his story of his ups and downs candidly, and spoke about how he taught more to budding entrepreneurs watching the show then any of the sharks could.

As I reflect on Mr. Cuban’s comments–it reaffirmed my thoughts that there is a key component missing in the show–one of the sharks should be a lender, not an investor.

After all, every time an entrepreneur needs money for their business–they should consider debt and equity options.  Sometimes the choice is very black and white–because in some cases there isn’t a lender or an investor who would do a particular deal.  But in plenty of cases, the choice is gray, and this should be highlighted on Shark Tank.

I would love to see a lender on the show, sitting side-by-side with investors, asking the entrepreneur questions about their cash flow, collateral, and credit.  Entrepreneurs should know that these issues matter.  Additionally, I would like to see the sharks sharpen their value proposition to an entrepreneur, when and if there is a viable lending option on the table.

It would be fascinating to watch an entrepreneur have to make a decision in front of millions of watchers between taking a loan and keeping control of their company but have to risk their house a collateral or taking an investment.  That’s a far tougher decision between giving “x” percent of your company up to on shark or “y” to another.

It might even be juicier to watch an entrepreneur decide between a 6 percent interest loan that requires them to put their house on the line versus a 30 percent loan that does not.  Or, it could be compelling to watch an entrepreneur realize they have forfeited a loan option because they previously took on an investor who is not willing to personally guarantee a loan.

These debates would add a compelling component to the show, add to its drama, as well as its educational value.  I hope the producers consider it.